Getting my first Mac , where should i start

Created at: 2021-03-23 03:15:31
Questioner General

I’m making the switch from pc to MacBook Pro , where should i start? I want to keep it safe from virus and malware, Can someone point me in the right direction as to where to start. Machine wont be here for about 2 weeks. Want to be ready to go when it gets here .

Answer #1:

By: Savannah Rosenbaum

I’m making the switch from pc to MacBook Pro , where should i start? I want to keep it safe from virus and malware, Can someone point me in the right direction as to where to start. Machine wont be here for about 2 weeks. Want to be ready to go when it gets here .

Answer #2:

By: Mr. Bernhard Lowe MD

Regarding virus and malware, I have never used any 3rd party protection. Many cause more issues than they prevent. What I use: macOS - Security - Apple



The following may also help:

Move your data from a Windows PC to your Mac - Apple Support

Mac tips for Windows switchers - Apple Support

Welcome to MacBook Pro Essentials - Apple Support

Answer #4:

By: Jaden Miller

No anti-virus necessarry on a Mac, and not recommended at all. Most just cause issues and slow down your Mac. Avoid them.

Windows viruses cannot run on Macs, and there are pretty much no viruses for Mac at this point.



Exercise common sense, and caution when visiting websites and downloading stuff and you'll be fine. Be careful where you click. The common source of malware currently are Calendar subscriptions. They appear as popups on unsavory websites, and can get you to install these rogue calendars. These are just annoying more than destructive though, and can easily be removed by deleting the calendar.



Don't treat the Mac as a Windows computer. It isn't. Many things will be very different.



If you bought one of the new M1 MacBook Pros, do note, you won't be able to run Windows on it in any way at this time. If you require any Windows based Apps, that have no Mac counterparts then you won't have access to them.



Start looking for your Applications for Mac. Can't transfer Windows Apps to the Mac directly, so you will need to download and install the Mac versions if any available.



As a recent switcher to Mac myself from decades of Windows usage, it's a rough first few days, but then it's smooth sailing. I was familiar with Mac, since I had used a 2007 iMac prior to this somewhat (not as a daily driver) and a 2011 Mac mini as a file and web server again, not a daily driver. Moving to an M1 MacBook Air from a Windows 10 Dell Inspiron has been quite the experience.









Answer #6:

By: Andreanne Halvorson IV

Regarding virus and malware, I have never used any 3rd party protection. Many cause more issues than they prevent. What I use: macOS - Security - Apple



The following may also help:

Move your data from a Windows PC to your Mac - Apple Support

Mac tips for Windows switchers - Apple Support

Welcome to MacBook Pro Essentials - Apple Support

Answer #7:

By: Darlene Conn

You don’t need an antivirus for a Mac; the built-in protection is excellent, and is updated as needed to keep it protected. There is also a built-in firewall that you can enable. With Mac OS 11, which comes on all new Macs, the operating system itself is in a separate, write-protected partition so it can’t be hacked. When you first set it up you will be given the option to encrypt your drive if you feel you need extra protection.



Most malware for Macs is annoying (like pop-up ads) but not dangerous. The built-in protection against malware is good; If you want to be even better protected against this I suggest malwarebytes, but it isn’t essential. Avoid any software that offers to “improve” the performance of your Mac; there is none that provides any benefit, and most of them (including the very heavily advertised ones) just get in the way.



When your Mac is delivered the setup is straightforward and self-explanatory. You will also get an email offer for a free online one-on-one session with a Mac specialist to show you the basics.

Answer #8:

By: Belle Johns

No anti-virus necessarry on a Mac, and not recommended at all. Most just cause issues and slow down your Mac. Avoid them.

Windows viruses cannot run on Macs, and there are pretty much no viruses for Mac at this point.



Exercise common sense, and caution when visiting websites and downloading stuff and you'll be fine. Be careful where you click. The common source of malware currently are Calendar subscriptions. They appear as popups on unsavory websites, and can get you to install these rogue calendars. These are just annoying more than destructive though, and can easily be removed by deleting the calendar.



Don't treat the Mac as a Windows computer. It isn't. Many things will be very different.



If you bought one of the new M1 MacBook Pros, do note, you won't be able to run Windows on it in any way at this time. If you require any Windows based Apps, that have no Mac counterparts then you won't have access to them.



Start looking for your Applications for Mac. Can't transfer Windows Apps to the Mac directly, so you will need to download and install the Mac versions if any available.



As a recent switcher to Mac myself from decades of Windows usage, it's a rough first few days, but then it's smooth sailing. I was familiar with Mac, since I had used a 2007 iMac prior to this somewhat (not as a daily driver) and a 2011 Mac mini as a file and web server again, not a daily driver. Moving to an M1 MacBook Air from a Windows 10 Dell Inspiron has been quite the experience.